Displaying 1 - 35 of 60

Nathan Bickart (2013)

Planting in Cal's Backyard: Raised-Bed Gardens for Creeks, Kids, and Communities

Nathan's project will focus on improving ecosystem and community health through the construction of raised-bed community gardens near Wildcat Creek, which runs through Richmond and San Pablo, CA. Riparian habitats in these communities, particularly when they occur at the end of a dead-end street, are frequently used as trash dumps by less-than-certified trash haulers, creating a hazard for the local community and driving citizens away from these natural spaces. Nathan will work with a variety of community partners, including Urban Creeks Council and the cities of Richmond and San Pablo, to build strategically placed raised-bed gardens that will prevent pick-up trucks from backing up to and polluting these neglected habitats. Furthermore, the project aims to improve the health of these challenged communities by increasing access to healthy foods (grown in the garden) and open spaces. Creek restoration will be pursued in concert with garden construction, such that the creek... Read More

Pablo Seward (2014)

"Umanga Tupuna": A Communal Intervention in Contemporary Rapanui History

"Umanga Tupuna" ("Food-Work With Ancestors") consists of the re-conceptualization of Easter Island (Chile), a Polynesian island in the South Pacific Ocean, as the complex performance space it used to be prior to colonial dispossession in the 19th century. The first stage of the project will be to gather oral historians, and to enlist and re-inhabit key places on the island with unresolved histories. Inhabitation for Rapanui people consists of making offerings to emplaced ancestors, who then reciprocally share thoughts, dreams, and stories of the place. The second stage of the project will be to collaboratively make illustrated fictionalized accounts of these experiences. The third stage will be to organize free trips around the island for Rapanui children, as well as workshops with the general population, such that the place-histories in question may be put in conversation with one another. The fourth and final stage will be to compile, publish, and divulge the illustrated... Read More

Mayuri Bhandari (2012)

A Language Without Words

For her Stronach Baccalaureate Prize project, Mayuri will teach dance and movement to blind and deaf children, ages 3-15, at a school located in a small village in Maharashtra, India. Mayuri states, "All children need movement in their lives, not only as a form of physical fitness but also as a form of enrichment for their souls. In India especially, disabled children do not get such opportunities. Statistics state that India has the world's largest population of children, and one in every ten is disabled." Using a variety of dance styles and activities, Mayuri will train instructors and students in different forms of creative self-expression. She hopes to expand her dance program across India to more schools for the handicapped.

 

Rodney Wilson (2015)

Per Ankh: House of Life, House of Learning

The Per Ankh “house of life” was a central institution in Kemet (Ancient Egypt), dating back thousands of years to the pyramid age. All large urban areas and major temples through Kemet housed a Per Ankh. It was located within the temple and was where all formal learning and wise instruction took place, as it was responsible for the production and storing of books, and the teaching of scribes and priest. It was also where the doctors and priest practiced medicine and induced healing dreams. The Per Ankh is the oldest known and one of the most exalted intuitions in Africa’s long tradition of learning.

In partnership with faculty and staff at Contra Costa College (CCC) the Per Ankh program will be committed to enriching, fostering, and nurturing the educational experience of all students, with a special focus on African American high school students who may also be first-generation college students. Ultimately the program seeks to prepare our students for academic, personal,... Read More

Muska Fazilat (2015)

Safe Motherhood

Afghanistan has some of the highest maternal mortality and infant morbidity rates in the world. Most Afghan women do not have access to basic maternal health care, especially in rural areas. Skilled providers attend only 36% of births in Afghanistan with improvements in health care since US intervention, and every thirty minutes an Afghan woman dies due to birth complications. Over 80% of births take place at home in Afghanistan. Ms. Fazilat’s project, “Safe Motherhood,” aims to reduce maternal mortality rates in the poorest and most remote villages in Kunduz--a province located in Northeastern region of Afghanistan--by training and educating traditional midwives who currently lack formal training and essential medical knowledge about safe birthing practices.

Iman Abdella (2017)

Yemeni Youth Project (YYP)

Early in her academic career, Iman began to seek mentors who looked like her who could guide her growing intellectual curiosity. She soon noticed the lack of a bridge between her community and higher education. As a Yemeni woman, she experienced the difficulty in attaining proper representation in the academic world and fulfilling her need for mentorship and guidance. Iman’s project is an extension of the afterschool mentorship program for Yemeni students at Oakland International High School (OIHS) that she co-founded during her time at UC Berkeley. The Yemeni Youth Program (YYP) serves recent Yemeni immigrants and refugees at OIHS through personal and academic support. The Bay Area is home to the third largest Yemeni population in the United States. Mentors from UC Berkeley will connect with Yemeni students on a weekly basis. Lesson plans will be geared towards the needs of the students in all aspects of life. Through YYP, students will have the opportunity to visit college... Read More

Rasheed Shabazz (2013)

To Plead our Own Cause: Sharing the Stories of Afrikan/Black Students in the UC

Rasheed will organize a UC-wide Afrikan/Black Student Media Collective that will empower student communities to share their own stories and experiences. Working with the Afrikan/Black Coalition, a UC wide network of student leaders, Rasheed will build a news website and a network of hyper-local social media profiles, and produce an online news show and podcast. The cutting edge project will combine journalism, community organizing and media communications to develop grassroots storytellers who will not only counter negative media images about Black students, but empower students to document their own experiences on campus. The goal of this project is to work together with Black UC students to create their own narratives about themselves and their communities.

Jessica Reyes (2016)

WINGS

Jessica’s project, WINGS, is a restorative justice program in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights for the children of incarcerated adults. These neighboring cities form a community of predominantly Latina/o and immigrant residents that continues a historical legacy of political resistance. WINGS will recruit a cohort of 15-20 youth for a 48-week program. The goal of this program is to address the effects of incarceration holistically through a series of workshops rooted in health and wellness, art and creative expression, popular education, community engagement, skill shares, and emotional support. The program will entail 24 sessions (meeting every other week) of workshops, skill shares, and other forms of popular education. 14 of the 24 sessions will be pre-planned and include: an introductory retreat, a Know Your Rights workshop catered to youth of color, Sex Education, (4) skill shares, (3) healing/wellness workshops led by community members, a “Healthy Peoples Series”, an... Read More

Jeffrey Martin (2008)

The Gila River Indian Community Water Settlement Act: Understanding a Historical Milestone

Jeffrey Martin will conduct a detailed study of the Gila River Indian Community Water Settlement Act of 2004, one of the largest and longest-coming Indian water rights settlements in the history of the United States. Representing deeply entrenched battles over water rights and Indian sovereignty in the West, the Act settled nearly 30 years of litigation involving thousands of actors who fought to quantify and define rights on the Gila River. Jeff will examine the origin, voices, and impact of this historic legislation and its implications for future water disputes. The settlement brought water to the Pima and Maricopa peoples of southern Arizona following more than a century of struggle since the river was diverted from their lands in 1866, thus destroying their agricultural practices. Martin plans to interview tribal leaders and members, members of non-Indian business and agricultural interests, and government entities.

Michael Uy (2008)

Analysis of Venezuela's Music Education System, "El Sistema," and its Potential Application to the Los Angeles-based Program, Project Harmony

Michael Uy will investigate Venezuela’s music education system, Fundación del Estado para el Sistema Nacional de las Orquestas Juveniles e Infantiles de Venezuela (FESNOJIV), more commonly known as “El Sistema.” Conductor Simon Rattle and other luminaries in classical music have lavished praise on El Sistema’shigh musical standards and social vision. Offering free instruction, the Venezuelan government currently trains more than 250,000 youths in the instrumental and choral traditions of classical music. Uy will document the organizational, pedagogical and financial structures of this program, taking note of both successes and challenges in and around Caracas, including its impressive track-record in helping juvenile offenders, street kids, victims of abuse, and children with cognitive and physical disabilities. He will then share his insights with the Harmony Project, a nonprofit organization that offers free music training to... Read More

Gabriel Cortez And Natasha Huey (2013)

The Write Home Project

To be homeless in the US is to be a member of a population with few advocates and progressively fewer resources. In the face of the rapidly increasing criminalization of homeless people, Berkeley-based humanitarian organizations like the Suitcase Clinic work hard to provide basic needs, food and shelter, for their clients. However, it is clear that this is not enough. Gabriel and Natasha envision the transformation of shelters and clinics into spaces that better facilitate the expression of voice and positive human connection and that foster dialogue, empathy and understanding between homeless and local populations. They view the creation of creative spaces as critical to altering the life trajectories of people, especially youth, experiencing homelessness. Their project will use weekly poetry writing workshops and monthly open mics to create better spaces for serving the holistic well-being of the homeless youth population. Their project will also utilize a multimedia campaign and... Read More

Olivia Rosaldo-Pratt (2008)

Acting Up - Empowering Young People of Color Through Drama Education

Olivia Rosaldo-Pratt will seek to develop a new way of teaching drama that is both accessible and empowering for young people of color. Although drama is an effective pedagogical tool, it is often unavailable to students of color or offered in ways that can make it feel unappealing. To remedy this situation, Olivia plans to research socially conscious drama methods in preparation to design a new curriculum that she will bring to several East Bay middle schools. She will teach her students a wide range of skills, including performance techniques, memorization, public speaking, and English acquisition, while exploring issues of race, power, teamwork, and anger management with them. She will then share her findings with other theater educators.

Emma Shaw Crane (2009)

Indigenous Women's Media and Poetry Project

Working with COMPPA, a collective based in Chiapas, Mexico, Emma will develop and facilitate the Indigenous and Garífuna Women's Media and Poetry Project, a series of workshops offered at peoples' community organizations in Chiapas and Oaxaca (Mexico), Petén, Alta Verapaz, and Quiché, (Guatemala), and Intibucá, Antlántida & Tegucigalpa (Honduras). The project proposes to address underdevelopment, low literacy rates, and lack of political representation for indigenous and Garífuna communities, particularly women, through community radio and poetry. The central premise of the project is that access to media and literacy among young women is integral to economic, cultural, political self-determination. The project emphasizes the community radio and poetry as necessary tools of resistance and as ways of building autonomy.

In the process of completing this project, Emma will strengthen her facilitation skills and develop a variety of Spanish-language poetry and media arts... Read More

Sun Lee (2007)

East Timorese Testimonial Narratives — Identification and Reconciliation after Mass Atrocity

Sun Lee’s project inquired into the mind of the East Timorese — asking their opinions on the state of justice in their country regarding the events of 1999, when the Indonesian military inflicted mass violence upon Timorese civilians as they voted to become independent from Indonesia. The UN established a Special Crimes Panel in order to investigate the events, and a national truth and reconciliation commission (CAVR) worked hard to produce a massive report documenting the events. But the thoughts of the Timorese themselves were never solicited in full. Sun investigated how ideas of justice differed for the Timorese in comparison with international opinion and also among Timorese from various backgrounds. Documenting these voices in the form of personal accounts was the primary objective of the fieldwork period, which resulted in the production of hours of digital video. The editing process will produce a twofold final product: a collection of interviews to go into the... Read More

Ryan Bosworth (2010)

Map Delft: A Community-Based Approach to the Provision of Informal Settlement Maps

Ryan's project is a community-building program designed to produce detailed, open-source street-level maps of three unmapped temporary relocation areas (TRAs) in Delft, Cape Town, South Africa; home to an estimated one hundred thousand displaced residents.

Ryan's work in Cape Town involves local community-based organizations, township residents, IkamvaYouth students (www.ikamvayouth.org), OpenStreetMap (OSM) volunteers, and students and faculty from the University of Cape Town in a participatory mapping project. The three main objectives of project are to (1) develop community support networks for recently displaced residents, (2) to strengthen the capacity of non-governmental and community-based organizations to provide relief to Delft residents, and (3) to teach computer literacy, basic web programming, and mapping workshops to a sample of the more than 600 economically disadvantaged youth currently enrolled in IkamvaYouth's after... Read More

Marco Flores (2012)

Undocuqueer Art Making: Healing Practices Through Self-Expression

"I am grateful for those first moments of consciousness, always born from a living experience of injustice turned to righteous rage, that first experience of genuine collectivism, that blessed epiphany of art-inspired action."
- Cherrie Moraga, A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness

Marco's Stronach Baccalaureate Prize project, "Undocuqueer Art Making," intends to increase awareness of the intersections in LGBT and immigrant identity by disrupting conventional ways of thinking about undocumented immigrant youth. His project uses the arts as a vehicle for healing by making room for complex immigrant identities through a space of creativity. It serves as a catalyst towards understanding the significance of testimonios through a series of creative art making workshops. With his "Undocuqueer Art Making" project, Marco seeks to create a form of collective consciousness by engaging in artistic forms of self-expression through story-telling, creative writing,... Read More

Olivia Dill (2015)

Overlapping Disciplines: Using New Technology to Preserve and Create Access to Historic Ethnographic Field Recordings

Olivia’s project explores the intersection between technology, physics, anthropology, preservation and community need. The Phoebe A. Hearst Anthropology Museum, UC Berkeley Linguistics Department, the University Library and LBNL scientists are partnering to build a new lab on campus that will digitize 2700 recordings in the Anthropology museum collection. The collection consists largely of ethnographic field recordings made of Native Californians by UC Berkeley anthropologists in the early 1900’s. This audio is of high cultural sensitivity and value to the present day members of the tribes recorded on them, but is difficult to access and in delicate preservation state due to the medium on which it was recorded, the wax cylinder. The preservation effort aims to improve access and preservation by employing a new technology created and designed at LBNL that uses 3D photographs of the cylinders to make digital versions of the audio without making contact with the surface. For her... Read More

Jonathan Lee (2009)

Community Health in Rural Honduras: Preventing Disease, Guarding Your Health

Jonathan Lee will be developing primary healthcare infrastructure in rural communities of the central, mountainous region of Honduras. Geographic, political, and economic distance from basic healthcare provoke what should be mild conditions into life threatening emergencies for the poor in this region. The centerpiece of his project is the training of community health workers (CHWs) to deliver efficient, home-based healthcare to families as well as to refer patients to La Clinica Santa Rosa de Lima, one of the only clinics for a widespread population of over 60,000. The CHWs, called Guardianes de Salud or "Health Guardians," will be empowered with a text messaging-based communication infrastructure that will provide two-way communication between nurses and physicians at La Clinica and the CHWs. This system, powered by FrontlineSMS:Medic, is a free, open-source software program that enables large-scale, two-way text messaging using only a laptop, a GSM modem, and cell phones.... Read More

Ricardo Gomez (2012)

Other Frames: From 'Dream Factory' to Dream Communities

For his Stronach Baccalaureate Prize project, Ricardo will return to his hometown of Oxnard, California to build film collectives at local high school sites. Through collaborative workshops, skill-shares, and community events, students will learn how to develop, produce, and share their own voices, visions, narratives, and creative expressions through film and video. Ricardo states, "Through working on this project, I also plan to collaboratively discover and document a pedagogical approach to teaching film theory and practice that is both culturally relevant to youth from low-income communities of color and up-to-date with contemporary digital video and online publishing practices."

You can see a short presentation on Ricardo's project athttp://prezi.com/xslrobkokvu2/cihs-videofilm-informational-presentation/

Brett Buckingham and Ailén Vega (2016)

Participatory Mapping in Brazil's Tapajós River Basin

Brett and Ailén’s project engages the Munduruku indigenous communities of the northern Brazilian Amazon in a participatory, counter-hegemonic mapping project.  The Munduruku people are currently fighting against the Brazilian government’s plans to construct what would become one of the world’s largest hydroelectric dams, the São Luiz do Tapajós, and lead to the decimation of the Munduruku’s means of survival and of a sacred place central to their identity as a people. With the support of partner organizations Amazon Watch and Digital Democracy, Brett and Ailén will work alongside communities to produce maps that depict the land practices, cultural spaces, and histories of the Munduruku through community workshops and open-source mapping technologies. In positioning the Munduruku as the leaders of the mapping process, this project creates alternative cartographic representations to support these communities’ lobbying efforts on the national and international level.

Irene Chemtai Mungo (2007)

Community Health Education and Training Project: Mombasa, Kenya

Like most of Sub-Saharan Africa, Kenya is adversely affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic, with over 1.3 million people living with the virus. For her Stronach project, Irene endeavored to provide critical health education at the AIDS Research and Family Care Clinic in the Kenyan city of Mombasa, where poverty, joblessness, limited education, and cultural stigma are all obstacles to treating and caring for children with HIV/AIDS. She developed a health resource guidebook in both English and Swahili to help families better understand HIV/AIDS and provide proper care for children with the disease. She wanted her guidebook to communicate health lessons through simple language and the drawings of local children. Irene also planned to organize educational workshops for caregivers and adolescent patients, bring presentations on HIV/AIDS and other health topics to area schools, and sponsor an essay contest in which students could propose ways to address health issues in their lives and... Read More

Crislin Christian (2018)

Critical Youth Media

Critical Youth Media is a media literacy and arts program that provides low-income high school students of color on the West and South Sides of Chicago with the intellectual tools to critically engage with the media imagery and information they process and internalize every day. City and state policy that enables the privatization of education via charter schools, the militarization of police, and the eradication of adequate housing and accessible health facilities consistently have the most drastic impacts on poor communities of color, where crime rates and gun-related violence tend to grasp national media attention instead.

Critical Youth Media will serve marginalized youth of color with the creative resources, holistic guidance, and academic access needed to effectively mobilize against over-simplified and heavily scrutinized media representations. The program will host five media literacy and production workshops throughout the 2018-2019 school year for about 6-8... Read More

Luis Flores (2013)

Discovering the IRCA Generation: Building Communal Migrant History and Credit Protection

By constructing a history and political economy of the "IRCA generation" of migrants*, this project will present a counterpoint to the burgeoning public migration debate and eminent legislation. Three million undocumented workers obtained legal status under Immigration Reform and Control Act’s (IRCA) 1986 amnesty provision. Yet remarkably, no significant attempt to recount the lessons and histories of this legislation has been made, even as a new amnesty law may be imminent. This time around, the resurgence of the migration debate has brought impassionate arguments for the provision of amnesty to millions of undocumented migrants living in the U.S. as a form of economic stimulus.

Migrant cultural assimilation is being articulated as their participation in home mortgage markets and in stressing that granting legal amnesty to undocumented migrants would generate an estimated input of $500 billion into the economy, immigration reform is also being promoted as a path to recovery... Read More

Petro Kostiv (2006)

Land Reform in Post-Apartheid South Africa

Petro Kostiv is working with three indigenous Zulu communities in South Africa who were forcibly displaced from their land by the racist policies of past governments. Due to historical, socio-economic, and political marginalization, many dispossessed South Africans are still unable to have their grievances recognized today. Such communities were identified merely as a landless people following the end of apartheid while the harsh reality of their daily lives remained ignored. Petro's chief objective will be to study and give voice to their struggle in the new political context of democracy. His project will build on South African field work concerning apartheid that he completed in spring 2006 for his senior thesis in the History Department.

Kazooba Kawamara (2013)

Ntoroko District Orphan Database and Placement

For his Stronach Baccalaureate Prize project, Kazooba and his team of volunteers will locate orphans in Ntoroko, Uganda and record them into a secure database that will be used to match orphans with available social services. The secure database will be housed at the district headquarters and will include age, point of contact, and level of need. The completed database will then be used to place the orphans into existing government programs and NGO services such as healthcare, academic tutoring, psychological help, adoption, and emergency aid. There are few services to help the estimated 2 million orphans in Uganda and these services are often concentrated in cities and towns where homeless orphans are visible on the streets. But most orphans reside in the rural parts of the country like Ntoroko. The goal of this project is to make sure orphans in Ntoroko, and ultimately all of Uganda, are identified and provided with access to available services.

Adriana SanchezPillot (2015)

Indigenous Communities Building Historical Memory to Create Alternative Justice

Justice is composed of four elements: truth, reparations, sanctions, and non-repetition. This project aims to strengthen the efforts of the Chol organized communities in Northern Chiapas to create alternative forms of justice via a process of documenting historical memory and lived experiences. The purpose is to address the continuing violation of indigenous peoples’ right to justice, and the impunity of the crimes against humanity condoned by the Mexican State in the Northern and Forest regions of Chiapas between 1996 and 2006. These crimes happened in the context of the counterinsurgency war against the Zapatistas led by the Mexican government, as well as decades of unresolved land claims, displacement, and neoliberal reforms. In collaboration with the Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Human Rights Center, the project will reinforce the Center’s legal, logistical, and media support of these cases. The process of constructing historical memory will involve documentation through... Read More

Eleanor Lum And Joshua Arnold (2014)

Healing from the Ground Up: Soil Testing, Storytelling, and Ecological Restoration in Richmond, CA

Healing from the Ground Up is a community based, participatory educational project whose mission is to assess and map the state of soil health in the city of Richmond, California, for the purposes of empowering communities with necessary tools to reclaim urban soils for agriculture and health. Through a participatory soil mapping process we will identify, test, and plot by GPS areas currently and potentially used for urban agriculture, creating a baseline reference point for the state of soils throughout Richmond. In addition, we will collaborate with the community to design and create a handcrafted map detailing their stories of the places being sampled. This map will explore and document how the soil testing fits into the lived experiences of the community through oral histories of people's connections to the land, (i.e., old farms or gardens, past contamination events, etc.) and the potential for future practicing urban farmers. Lastly, to address the marginal soils, we will... Read More

Cherie Hill (2006)

Remembering the Ancestors

Directed and choreographed by Cherie Hill, the work blends modern and Afro-Caribbean dance featuring live percussion by New York artist Taji Maalik. The dance premied in December of 2006 at the Live Oak Theatre in Berkeley.

Remembering the Ancestors expands on Cherie's senior honors research, which explored how dance could be used to subvert stereotypes associated with black women. Cherie traveled to Jamaica to study ancient Caribbean and Diaspora dances that early European explorers considered overtly sexual. She made these dances the basis for her modern piece, choreographed using postmodern techniques. Cherie also plans to host two creative dance workshops for at-risk children. Her work raises awareness about issues of race and gender and depictions of black women in popular culture.

Video of Remembering the Ancestors

Teddy Kisch (2006)

Ok Tedi / Fly River Resource Center, Papua New Guinea

Grant awarded: $25,000 

Teddy is working to establish and direct an environmental resource center for communities affected by the Ok Tedi Copper Mine in the Western Province of Papua New Guinea. The mine is reported to be dumping 80,000 tons of mine tailings (toxic to algae) into the world's twenty-third largest river system each day, thereby seriously impacting the local food supply for 50,000 indigenous people living along the river. The resource center will serve as a scientific clearinghouse for mining documents. It will "translate" the documents into simple, culturally appropriate information so the community may make informed decisions about mining operations at local and provincial level meetings. It will also provide education about sustainability issues and the review process of the highly contested Community Mine Continuation Agreements. The center will operate under a new director after Teddy returns to the United States in May 2007.

For more about the... Read More

Darya Chernova (2017)

"Telaboratoria" - Body Laboratory

Telaboratoria, which means Body Laboratory in Russian, is a nine-month therapeutic and empowering dance and theater program for the LGBTQ community of St. Petersburg, Russia. The vision of Telaboratoria is based on the success of a four-hour pilot dance workshop that Dasha facilitated for the St. Petersburg transgender community in the spring of 2016 while doing Independent Study Abroad as a UC Berkeley student.

When marginalized groups participate in a practice of dance and theater, it has a tremendous effect on multiple aspects of their lives, such as getting health benefits from a physical activity, accessing one’s creativity and developing a sense of a collective identity. The Russian LGBTQ community is in dire need of such a creative movement program to survive in the hostile environment of institutionalized homophobia and transphobia. Having worked with LGBTQ individuals in the hostile Russian environment before, Dasha is partnering up with Coming Out... Read More

Yoram Savion-Royant (2008)

Youth Multimedia Literacy & Production (Y Media-LP)

Yoram Savion-Royant will work to create a new narrative of crime and punishment that promotes restorative justice. Tapping into the creative and healing power of youth, he will develop and lead a sustainable employment program in media literacy at the Youth UpRising community center in East Oakland. His young trainees will produce professional multimedia articles for the Oakland Tribune, the Alameda County Behavioral Health Services, and other public interest websites. Focused on increased policing, widespread institutional failures, and mass incarceration, their stories will document the lived experience of urban youth, highlighting not only the problems they encounter but also their solutions, thus imagining possibilities for social change. The Oakland Tribune has been publishing stories by Savion-Royant's team as part of its 2007 Homicide Report and 2008 Pieces of the Puzzle project.

Samma Ishaq (2008)

Documenting the Effects of the Shahtoosh Ban in Jammu and Kashmir: A Proposal to Find Alternative Sources of Income for Kashmiri Women

Samma Ishaq will evaluate the economic status of women living in Jammu and Kashmir (India-administered Kashmir). It is estimated that the livelihood of at least 50,000 workers, 74 percent of them women, was impacted when the local government banned the manufacture and sale of shahtoosh (a fine grade of shawl derived from the Tibetan antelope) in October 2000. Investigating this claim, Ishaq will assess the effect of the shahtoosh ban on the local economy, particularly on displaced female weavers. Her report will take into account the painful consequences of militarization over the past two decades since the region came under dispute by India, Pakistan and Kashmiri resistance fighters in 1989. Ultimately, she seeks to create a new program together with local NGOs that will empower and offer a source of revenue for the weavers, while addressing poverty issues that affect women.

Katya Moiseeva (2011)

The Dark Side of Russian "High End" Prostitution

Ekaterina's goal is to raise awareness about the negative effects of social acceptance and non-stigmatization of Russian 'high end' prostitution. Although Russian high end prostitutes face as much dehumanization and abuse as trafficked women/children from other parts of the world, notably South-East Asia, India, and Eastern Europe, they do not garner the same degree of global awareness. One reason for this lack of awareness is that the profile of a high end prostitute–educated, upper/middle class, Prada-dressed, beautiful–does not easily conform to feminist theories portraying prostitution as a male coerced, desperate way for disadvantaged women to earn subsistence money. High end prostitution among Russians is socially accepted and often encouraged by women's parents and spouses; the money earned through prostitution allows for upward social mobility and increased social status. Ekaterina will travel to Russia, China and Turkey to conduct interviews with Russian women who... Read More

Elias Hinit (2018)

Communities for Success

Communities for Success is a politically conscious after-school community mentoring/guidance program in Santa Rosa, California. This program will be in partnership with the city's rights of passage organization, Bridge to the Future, local interfaith organizations, the NAACP, our local community college, and community members for guidance and mentorship. Currently many marginalized community members and students valiantly provide for themselves and their families in a hostile, deprived environment of inadequate resources and structural pitfalls disproportionately impacting people of color. This program seeks to first and foremost strengthen cross-­‐cultural, geographic, and community relationships for community autonomy and agency to advance personally, communally, socially, academically, spiritually and however they see fit. Presently, it will be operating as a pilot program out of a local high school with many brilliant and amazing low-­‐income students, including... Read More

Adam Iscoe (2018)

Writing Between America

Rural America is an abstraction upon which no one can agree. The U.S. Census Bureau does not even use the term. Officially, what is rural is what is not urban—it is, demographers say, what is left over from the rest. That most people do not live there is all the more reason to get on a bicycle and go. Go, and ride all day. Then pitch a tent behind the firehouse in Sweetwater, Texas and wake up early to talk to folks before church and at the local Whataburger on a hot afternoon.

John Steinbeck, Paul Taylor, Dorothea Lange and Studs Terkel each spent the twentieth-century traversing the country and chronicling what they found. Their newspaper articles, photographs and oral histories are the product of a purposeful wandering that is forever impressed upon the world. Poets, for their part, have also approached the same important work for the same important reasons. Walt Whitman wrote America as he watched it. Vachel Lindsay traveled the nation penniless and afoot, trading his... Read More

Pages