Displaying 1 - 35 of 60

Rasheed Shabazz (2013)

To Plead our Own Cause: Sharing the Stories of Afrikan/Black Students in the UC

Rasheed will organize a UC-wide Afrikan/Black Student Media Collective that will empower student communities to share their own stories and experiences. Working with the Afrikan/Black Coalition, a UC wide network of student leaders, Rasheed will build a news website and a network of hyper-local social media profiles, and produce an online news show and podcast. The cutting edge project will combine journalism, community organizing and media communications to develop grassroots storytellers who will not only counter negative media images about Black students, but empower students to document their own experiences on campus. The goal of this project is to work together with Black UC students to create their own narratives about themselves and their communities.

Christopher Ategeka (2011)

Pedal or Power

"Obwomezi bwensi enu buli nka kagaali; tikasobora kugwa kasita kaba nikagenda" (translated from Rutooro as "Life is like a bicycle; in order to stay balanced you have to keep moving.") Those were the words of a stranger who gave Chris a ride on the back of his bicycle about a decade ago when he saw him on the side of the road catching his breath, blisters and cuts covering his bare feet after many miles of walking.

Motivated by his own experience growing up in rural Uganda and enduring first hand many of the difficulties posed by lack of adequate transportation, Chris will use his Stronach Baccalaureate Prize to launch "Pedal or Power," a project to help people in rural Uganda learn how to build and maintain their own bicycles using locally available resources. An additional aspect of the project is to refurbish used bicycles, motorizing them with small engines for flexible use. Bicycles will be distributed at no cost to school children, farmers, health care workers or local... Read More

Rachel Gottfried-Clancy And Gabriel Schwartzman (2014)

Mapping Environmental Justice: Citizen Science, Community Stories, and Public Data for Community Organizing

Rachel and Gabe will be launching a web platform and community organizing effort to serve communities in the midst of water crises, focusing on Southern West Virginia's coalfields and the Sacramento River Delta. The project will create a participatory web platform that involves all aspects of the water-quality monitoring process: from context and data collection, to visualization and organization. The web platform will incorporate government and community-collected data to bridge the gap between the "authoritative" and the "subjective". We hope to integrate data production and analysis with community participation and improve access to water-quality information, which communities can then use for political projects. The project will require a collaborative process amongst grassroots organizations, water experts, technical specialists and community members to implement participatory water monitoring efforts. To generate the necessary data to launch the online organizational... Read More

Darya Chernova (2017)

"Telaboratoria" - Body Laboratory

Telaboratoria, which means Body Laboratory in Russian, is a nine-month therapeutic and empowering dance and theater program for the LGBTQ community of St. Petersburg, Russia. The vision of Telaboratoria is based on the success of a four-hour pilot dance workshop that Dasha facilitated for the St. Petersburg transgender community in the spring of 2016 while doing Independent Study Abroad as a UC Berkeley student.

When marginalized groups participate in a practice of dance and theater, it has a tremendous effect on multiple aspects of their lives, such as getting health benefits from a physical activity, accessing one’s creativity and developing a sense of a collective identity. The Russian LGBTQ community is in dire need of such a creative movement program to survive in the hostile environment of institutionalized homophobia and transphobia. Having worked with LGBTQ individuals in the hostile Russian environment before, Dasha is partnering up with Coming Out... Read More

Katya Moiseeva (2011)

The Dark Side of Russian "High End" Prostitution

Ekaterina's goal is to raise awareness about the negative effects of social acceptance and non-stigmatization of Russian 'high end' prostitution. Although Russian high end prostitutes face as much dehumanization and abuse as trafficked women/children from other parts of the world, notably South-East Asia, India, and Eastern Europe, they do not garner the same degree of global awareness. One reason for this lack of awareness is that the profile of a high end prostitute–educated, upper/middle class, Prada-dressed, beautiful–does not easily conform to feminist theories portraying prostitution as a male coerced, desperate way for disadvantaged women to earn subsistence money. High end prostitution among Russians is socially accepted and often encouraged by women's parents and spouses; the money earned through prostitution allows for upward social mobility and increased social status. Ekaterina will travel to Russia, China and Turkey to conduct interviews with Russian women who... Read More

Rajan Hoyle (2015)

Project Arihini

The Garifuna descend from West African, Carib and Arawak peoples and are considered indigenous to Honduras. These three groups were brought together when a slave ship traveling from West Africa to the Americas crashed on the island of San Vicente, ensuring the freedom of the captive men. Over two hundred years later, the Garifuna account for less than two percent of Honduras’s population and continue to experience acute marginalization in social, political and economic spheres of life.

Project Arihini is a community-based platform that will apply methods from the disciplines of planning and journalism to build a geographic information system (GIS) of and for eleven Garifuna villages that dot a twenty-mile span of the northern coast of Honduras. In addition, a series of short-form multimedia interviews will be recorded of Garifuna youth giving voice to their lived experiences and shedding light on contemporary opportunities and constraints of village life. The regional GIS... Read More

Kazooba Kawamara (2013)

Ntoroko District Orphan Database and Placement

For his Stronach Baccalaureate Prize project, Kazooba and his team of volunteers will locate orphans in Ntoroko, Uganda and record them into a secure database that will be used to match orphans with available social services. The secure database will be housed at the district headquarters and will include age, point of contact, and level of need. The completed database will then be used to place the orphans into existing government programs and NGO services such as healthcare, academic tutoring, psychological help, adoption, and emergency aid. There are few services to help the estimated 2 million orphans in Uganda and these services are often concentrated in cities and towns where homeless orphans are visible on the streets. But most orphans reside in the rural parts of the country like Ntoroko. The goal of this project is to make sure orphans in Ntoroko, and ultimately all of Uganda, are identified and provided with access to available services.

Inna Shapiro (2012)

Democratizing Technology: Air Quality Monitoring

For her Stronach Baccalaureate Prize project, Inna work with community members in the San Nicholas region of Monterrey, Mexico to develop a standardized, transferable "tool-box" for measuring air contamination. Her project will utilize available, affordable air monitoring technology while taking into consideration site-specific conditions. The highly industrialized Monterrey metropolitan area currently faces increasing air pollution problems. Inna's story involves a very personal connection to the issue of air contamination. As a child, she was exposed to the "contaminated rain" of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant incident in the Soviet Union. Work in West Berkeley on the long-term risks of steel manufacturing emissions took Inna to Monterrey, Mexico, which had similar conditions. Her project now hopes to empower citizens to take the monitoring of air contamination into their own hands.

Jenna Cavelle (2012)

Recovering Cultural Memory: Irrigation Systems of the Owens Valley Paiute Indians

Jenna will travel to the Owens Valley to conduct a 9-month community service project which combines education, outreach, and technology to engage the Paiute Indian community in restoring cultural memory associated with their ancient irrigation systems. These waterworks are currently in danger of being lost in the Owens Valley landscape through weathering and human neglect, and in American memory through the loss of culturally transmitted traditional knowledge. Through community education and engagement, Jenna will work with tribal members to explore archival materials and document Paiute irrigation systems and their role in shaping Paiute culture through narrative, photography, and GIS/GPS mapping. As these remnant waterworks have not been properly mapped or maintained it is vitally important to resurrect Paiute understanding of the cultural significance of these irrigation systems and their place in Paiute traditional cultural landscapes. The results of Jenna's project will... Read More

Crislin Christian (2018)

Critical Youth Media

Critical Youth Media is a media literacy and arts program that provides low-income high school students of color on the West and South Sides of Chicago with the intellectual tools to critically engage with the media imagery and information they process and internalize every day. City and state policy that enables the privatization of education via charter schools, the militarization of police, and the eradication of adequate housing and accessible health facilities consistently have the most drastic impacts on poor communities of color, where crime rates and gun-related violence tend to grasp national media attention instead.

Critical Youth Media will serve marginalized youth of color with the creative resources, holistic guidance, and academic access needed to effectively mobilize against over-simplified and heavily scrutinized media representations. The program will host five media literacy and production workshops throughout the 2018-2019 school year for about 6-8... Read More

Yoram Savion-Royant (2008)

Youth Multimedia Literacy & Production (Y Media-LP)

Yoram Savion-Royant will work to create a new narrative of crime and punishment that promotes restorative justice. Tapping into the creative and healing power of youth, he will develop and lead a sustainable employment program in media literacy at the Youth UpRising community center in East Oakland. His young trainees will produce professional multimedia articles for the Oakland Tribune, the Alameda County Behavioral Health Services, and other public interest websites. Focused on increased policing, widespread institutional failures, and mass incarceration, their stories will document the lived experience of urban youth, highlighting not only the problems they encounter but also their solutions, thus imagining possibilities for social change. The Oakland Tribune has been publishing stories by Savion-Royant's team as part of its 2007 Homicide Report and 2008 Pieces of the Puzzle project.

Elias Hinit (2018)

Communities for Success

Communities for Success is a politically conscious after-school community mentoring/guidance program in Santa Rosa, California. This program will be in partnership with the city's rights of passage organization, Bridge to the Future, local interfaith organizations, the NAACP, our local community college, and community members for guidance and mentorship. Currently many marginalized community members and students valiantly provide for themselves and their families in a hostile, deprived environment of inadequate resources and structural pitfalls disproportionately impacting people of color. This program seeks to first and foremost strengthen cross-­‐cultural, geographic, and community relationships for community autonomy and agency to advance personally, communally, socially, academically, spiritually and however they see fit. Presently, it will be operating as a pilot program out of a local high school with many brilliant and amazing low-­‐income students, including... Read More

Mayuri Bhandari (2012)

A Language Without Words

For her Stronach Baccalaureate Prize project, Mayuri will teach dance and movement to blind and deaf children, ages 3-15, at a school located in a small village in Maharashtra, India. Mayuri states, "All children need movement in their lives, not only as a form of physical fitness but also as a form of enrichment for their souls. In India especially, disabled children do not get such opportunities. Statistics state that India has the world's largest population of children, and one in every ten is disabled." Using a variety of dance styles and activities, Mayuri will train instructors and students in different forms of creative self-expression. She hopes to expand her dance program across India to more schools for the handicapped.

 

Samma Ishaq (2008)

Documenting the Effects of the Shahtoosh Ban in Jammu and Kashmir: A Proposal to Find Alternative Sources of Income for Kashmiri Women

Samma Ishaq will evaluate the economic status of women living in Jammu and Kashmir (India-administered Kashmir). It is estimated that the livelihood of at least 50,000 workers, 74 percent of them women, was impacted when the local government banned the manufacture and sale of shahtoosh (a fine grade of shawl derived from the Tibetan antelope) in October 2000. Investigating this claim, Ishaq will assess the effect of the shahtoosh ban on the local economy, particularly on displaced female weavers. Her report will take into account the painful consequences of militarization over the past two decades since the region came under dispute by India, Pakistan and Kashmiri resistance fighters in 1989. Ultimately, she seeks to create a new program together with local NGOs that will empower and offer a source of revenue for the weavers, while addressing poverty issues that affect women.

Diana Mauricio (2014)

Nuestras Vidas Importan: A Bilingual Community Engagement Program for Madres

"I want the freedom to carve and chisel my own face, to staunch he bleeding with ashes, to fashion my own gods out of my entrails... with my own lumber, my own bricks, and mortar and my own feminist architecture." --Gloria E. Anzaldua

Nuestras Vidas Importan: A Bilingual Community Engagement Program for Madres, will create a space for immigrant and U.S Born Latina mothers to come together intergenerationally to explore and expand their understandings around their identities. Nuetsra Vidas Importan is a workshop-based bilingual community engagement program striving to build awareness of societal positionality, oppression, and privileges through self-education, empowerment, and solidarity building across racial, class, and gender identities. As an educational, resource, and skill sharing space, Nuestras Vidas Importan will help mothers learn how to navigate social and public institutions as well as career development. Nuestras Vidas Importanis a bridge, a translation from the... Read More

Rodney Wilson (2015)

Per Ankh: House of Life, House of Learning

The Per Ankh “house of life” was a central institution in Kemet (Ancient Egypt), dating back thousands of years to the pyramid age. All large urban areas and major temples through Kemet housed a Per Ankh. It was located within the temple and was where all formal learning and wise instruction took place, as it was responsible for the production and storing of books, and the teaching of scribes and priest. It was also where the doctors and priest practiced medicine and induced healing dreams. The Per Ankh is the oldest known and one of the most exalted intuitions in Africa’s long tradition of learning.

In partnership with faculty and staff at Contra Costa College (CCC) the Per Ankh program will be committed to enriching, fostering, and nurturing the educational experience of all students, with a special focus on African American high school students who may also be first-generation college students. Ultimately the program seeks to prepare our students for academic, personal,... Read More

Everardo Mora (2009)

Quality Fruit, Quality People, Quality Tamales: The Story of Del Monte Cannery's Farandula and Voices from the Shop Floor

Everardo Mora will create a new narrative of “cannery culture” infused with the voices, stories, and experiences of Latino cannery workers on Del Monte Plant 3’s shop floor. In 1999, Plant 3 closed it San José’s doors. It was the last full-scale cannery to operate in the Silicon Valley. Focusing on the social, cultural, and economic significance of Plant 3’s cannery community, Everardo’s study will raise public awareness about the social and cultural contributions of Latino cannery workers to the Silicon Valley’s rich agricultural history. His study will consider the “farandula,” which is a term used to describe the melody of Latino and mainstream American culture that sustained a sense of family for Plant 3’s cannery community. Everardo’s narrative will also include a digital media component. At 12, equipped with an 8mm camcorder, a blue hard hat, white hair-net and orange ear plugs, Everardo walked under conveyor belts dripping with fruit cocktail syrup, dashed from... Read More

William Ching (2009)

HIV Youth Project

In spite of recent anti-HIV/AIDS awareness and sexual health campaigns, youth continue to contract HIV at disproportionately higher rates than the general population. Stigma and fear of discrimination further discourage at-risk youth from getting tested. This creates additional barriers to treatment and negatively impacts the quality of life of youth who are already living with the disease. William Ching intends to illuminate the social and human costs of living with HIV/AIDS by collecting the oral histories of historically marginalized youth whose lives have been impacted by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. He plans to travel to major metropolitan areas around the country and work with both youth and community-based organizations to create a new HIV/AIDS education and prevention guide tailored to youth and young adults based on the lived experiences of HIV+ youth, women and communities of color. Underscoring education, prevention and destigmatization, William hopes to capitalize on... Read More

Olivia Dill (2015)

Overlapping Disciplines: Using New Technology to Preserve and Create Access to Historic Ethnographic Field Recordings

Olivia’s project explores the intersection between technology, physics, anthropology, preservation and community need. The Phoebe A. Hearst Anthropology Museum, UC Berkeley Linguistics Department, the University Library and LBNL scientists are partnering to build a new lab on campus that will digitize 2700 recordings in the Anthropology museum collection. The collection consists largely of ethnographic field recordings made of Native Californians by UC Berkeley anthropologists in the early 1900’s. This audio is of high cultural sensitivity and value to the present day members of the tribes recorded on them, but is difficult to access and in delicate preservation state due to the medium on which it was recorded, the wax cylinder. The preservation effort aims to improve access and preservation by employing a new technology created and designed at LBNL that uses 3D photographs of the cylinders to make digital versions of the audio without making contact with the surface. For her... Read More

Adriana SanchezPillot (2015)

Indigenous Communities Building Historical Memory to Create Alternative Justice

Justice is composed of four elements: truth, reparations, sanctions, and non-repetition. This project aims to strengthen the efforts of the Chol organized communities in Northern Chiapas to create alternative forms of justice via a process of documenting historical memory and lived experiences. The purpose is to address the continuing violation of indigenous peoples’ right to justice, and the impunity of the crimes against humanity condoned by the Mexican State in the Northern and Forest regions of Chiapas between 1996 and 2006. These crimes happened in the context of the counterinsurgency war against the Zapatistas led by the Mexican government, as well as decades of unresolved land claims, displacement, and neoliberal reforms. In collaboration with the Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Human Rights Center, the project will reinforce the Center’s legal, logistical, and media support of these cases. The process of constructing historical memory will involve documentation through... Read More

Lauren Herman (2011)

Expanding the Realm of Consumer Protection: The Case of Microcredit

While working and conducting research within a microcredit program in Kenya during the summer of 2010 and in January 2011, Lauren became aware of the lack of consumer protection measures to prevent predatory lending within microfinance institutions (MFIs). To bring awareness to this issue, Lauren's project will contribute to the legal education initiatives and resources for Kenyan microcredit borrowers through the creation of a consumer and legal education manual. She will collaborate with consumer advocacy groups and microcredit borrowers in Nairobi, Kenya to research and document the operational and loan requirements of the five largest Kenyan MFIs. This educational resource will assist clients in making informed and educated decisions about their participation in these financial institutions. Most importantly, the experiences of microcredit borrowers will be included in the manual to provide potential borrowers the opportunity to learn about the microcredit programs... Read More

Maya Weir (2013)

Community Yoga Project

Maya's project, Community Yoga Project, seeks to increase access to the practice of yoga by holding classes at various social justice organizations in the East Bay Area. Unfortunately, through the process of appropriation in the West, yoga has become a commercial industry that is marketed predominantly to a privileged demographic. Maya brings this awareness into her teaching as she strives to create classes that take into account the impact of historical structures of oppression. Providing access to the transformative and powerful practice of yoga aims to improve the emotional and physical health and wellness of marginalized communities in the East Bay. She will partner with the following organizations: Phat Beets Produce, North County Women's Center, Causa Justa: Just Cause, Energy Solidarity Cooperative, Planting Justice, Multicultural Community Center, Oakland Rising, Communities for a Better Environment at Tassafaronga Recreation Center and The Living Room Project.... Read More

Olivia Rosaldo-Pratt (2008)

Acting Up - Empowering Young People of Color Through Drama Education

Olivia Rosaldo-Pratt will seek to develop a new way of teaching drama that is both accessible and empowering for young people of color. Although drama is an effective pedagogical tool, it is often unavailable to students of color or offered in ways that can make it feel unappealing. To remedy this situation, Olivia plans to research socially conscious drama methods in preparation to design a new curriculum that she will bring to several East Bay middle schools. She will teach her students a wide range of skills, including performance techniques, memorization, public speaking, and English acquisition, while exploring issues of race, power, teamwork, and anger management with them. She will then share her findings with other theater educators.

Juan Velez (2017)

Revitalizing the NASA-YUWE Indigenous Bio-Cultural Memory: Preserving Traditional Seeds and Language Through Art and Play

The overarching goals of the project are to improve the livelihoods and revitalize the Bio-Cultural Memory of the Nasa Yuwe people in Colombia by preserving their language, agricultural seeds, traditional foods, and medicines.  By doing this Juan and his community partners seek to foster a synergistic process that strengthens the food and cultural sovereignty of the Nasa Yuwe people. They hope to contribute to the reconciliation of the Colombian society and to the healing of the Nasa Yuwe people who have been victims of systemic violence since the foundation of the country. This project is a participatory social strategy of territorial revitalization, resistance, and consolidation of peace in the area.  The project incorporates theater, dance, visual arts, and participatory workshops as pedagogic method to provide the Nasa youth with means of artistic expression while bringing awareness about the significance of preserving cultural sovereignty.  This will happen with the... Read More

Jonathan Lee (2009)

Community Health in Rural Honduras: Preventing Disease, Guarding Your Health

Jonathan Lee will be developing primary healthcare infrastructure in rural communities of the central, mountainous region of Honduras. Geographic, political, and economic distance from basic healthcare provoke what should be mild conditions into life threatening emergencies for the poor in this region. The centerpiece of his project is the training of community health workers (CHWs) to deliver efficient, home-based healthcare to families as well as to refer patients to La Clinica Santa Rosa de Lima, one of the only clinics for a widespread population of over 60,000. The CHWs, called Guardianes de Salud or "Health Guardians," will be empowered with a text messaging-based communication infrastructure that will provide two-way communication between nurses and physicians at La Clinica and the CHWs. This system, powered by FrontlineSMS:Medic, is a free, open-source software program that enables large-scale, two-way text messaging using only a laptop, a GSM modem, and cell phones.... Read More

Jessica Reyes (2016)

WINGS

Jessica’s project, WINGS, is a restorative justice program in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights for the children of incarcerated adults. These neighboring cities form a community of predominantly Latina/o and immigrant residents that continues a historical legacy of political resistance. WINGS will recruit a cohort of 15-20 youth for a 48-week program. The goal of this program is to address the effects of incarceration holistically through a series of workshops rooted in health and wellness, art and creative expression, popular education, community engagement, skill shares, and emotional support. The program will entail 24 sessions (meeting every other week) of workshops, skill shares, and other forms of popular education. 14 of the 24 sessions will be pre-planned and include: an introductory retreat, a Know Your Rights workshop catered to youth of color, Sex Education, (4) skill shares, (3) healing/wellness workshops led by community members, a “Healthy Peoples Series”, an... Read More

Sara Trail (2016)

Social Justice Sewing Academy

Sara’s project, the Social Justice Sewing Academy (SJSA), establishes a critical-consciousness sewing program for youth in inner-city areas who need an outlet to express themselves and want to develop a potentially profitable skill.  She will run two pilot sessions this summer, and will later permanently establish SJSA in partnership with a community or recreational center or high school.  SJSA will be comprised of two parts each day. First there will be a workshop developing participant's critical consciousness. Workshops will feature concepts such as colorism, intersectionality, feminist epistemology, and misogyny in hip hop. During these workshops, participants will discuss readings from Angela Davis, bell hooks, Kimberly Crenshaw, Toni Morrison, Patricia Hill Collins, Maya Angelou, Audre Lorde and others. SJSA will allow participants to explore, discuss and express modes of knowing, lived experiences and creativity.  Following the morning workshop, there will be in-... Read More

Camilo Salazar Prince (2006)

"Esta Noche" film

The film "Esta Noche" seeks to question labor practices and immigration policies in the United States and aims to portray the illegal immigrant as the new "invisible man" of our times. This fictional presentation will be based on a series of true stories of illegal Mexican/Latino immigrants, as recollected in interviews and documented by research. Produced by Divino Niño Filmes, "Esta Noche" will be Camilo Salazar Prince’s first feature-length film.

Jeffrey Martin (2008)

The Gila River Indian Community Water Settlement Act: Understanding a Historical Milestone

Jeffrey Martin will conduct a detailed study of the Gila River Indian Community Water Settlement Act of 2004, one of the largest and longest-coming Indian water rights settlements in the history of the United States. Representing deeply entrenched battles over water rights and Indian sovereignty in the West, the Act settled nearly 30 years of litigation involving thousands of actors who fought to quantify and define rights on the Gila River. Jeff will examine the origin, voices, and impact of this historic legislation and its implications for future water disputes. The settlement brought water to the Pima and Maricopa peoples of southern Arizona following more than a century of struggle since the river was diverted from their lands in 1866, thus destroying their agricultural practices. Martin plans to interview tribal leaders and members, members of non-Indian business and agricultural interests, and government entities.

Alfredo Figueroa (2018)

Keeping Our Promise to Deported Veterans

Imagine having risked your life for a country that later deports you. There are men and women who swore an oath to protect and serve the United States, but that loyalty was not returned and they were banished. This project aims to raise awareness and funds in the Bay Area for men and women who served in the military but were later deported. My efforts will serve as a branch of a larger movement that strives to change immigration policy, halt the deportation of immigrants that served (or are currently serving) in the armed forces, and pass legislation to bring back veterans who were deported.

Issues regarding legality and citizenship have dominated the lives of millions of immigrants.  Non-natives who served this nation are not exempt from unjust immigration policies that result in the separation of families and the denial of valuable resources such as healthcare, food, and shelter. Keeping Our Promise to Deported Veterans is a project that will raise funds and... Read More

Emma Shaw Crane (2009)

Indigenous Women's Media and Poetry Project

Working with COMPPA, a collective based in Chiapas, Mexico, Emma will develop and facilitate the Indigenous and Garífuna Women's Media and Poetry Project, a series of workshops offered at peoples' community organizations in Chiapas and Oaxaca (Mexico), Petén, Alta Verapaz, and Quiché, (Guatemala), and Intibucá, Antlántida & Tegucigalpa (Honduras). The project proposes to address underdevelopment, low literacy rates, and lack of political representation for indigenous and Garífuna communities, particularly women, through community radio and poetry. The central premise of the project is that access to media and literacy among young women is integral to economic, cultural, political self-determination. The project emphasizes the community radio and poetry as necessary tools of resistance and as ways of building autonomy.

In the process of completing this project, Emma will strengthen her facilitation skills and develop a variety of Spanish-language poetry and media arts... Read More

Hector Gutierrez (2011)

Oral Histories of Permanent Workers in the Temporary Economy

Day labor is a nationwide phenomenon. Each morning, at hundreds of open-air hiring sites in cities throughout the United States, workers and employers meet to arrange employment for the day. These sites are labor markets where workers (often undocumented) gather, eagerly awaiting for prospective employers to hire them to complete short-term clean-up, gardening, painting, demolition and other manual labor projects. For his Stronach Baccalaureate Prize project, Hector will create an oral history anthology and photography exhibit that seeks to illuminate the lived experiences of day laborers in California. The project will examine the ways day laborers navigate the different geopolitical, social, and economic barriers that deny them the opportunities to achieve upward social mobility. The project will draw on Nancy Scheper-Hughes' concept of "engaged and enraged ethnographies" as a means to document the exploitation and denigration faced by day laborers living and working in... Read More

Irene Kucherova (2010)

Enhancement Pilot Program for Orphanage 1 in Kherson, Ukraine

Irene will spend nine months working with the 240 children ages 6-16 years old of Orphanage 1 in Kherson, Southern Ukraine. As wards of the state, these children live their lives in relative isolation from the wider community and are quite marginalized socially. Through outreach programs to the local community and university, Irene intends to involve community members and university students as tutors, mentors, and inspirational figures for the children through participation in structured enrichment programs. She also plans to broaden the children's life experiences by taking them to local universities and introducing them to local educational opportunities. In addition, she will accompany groups of children to the capital city, Kiev, the political, cultural and social heart of the country. An further component of the program will be career training. Irene will help students design, create and sell their crafts at a local market. Irene believes her project can be a template pilot... Read More

Matthew Chang (2017)

The Student Immigration Relief Clinic

Matthew’s project, the Student Immigration Relief Clinic, addresses the need for pro-bono legal immigration documentation assistance as well as the shortage of volunteers to provide this service. The Student Immigration Relief Clinic is a student run, free legal clinic to be held regularly throughout the academic year. This clinic is supported by various UC Berkeley student organizations along with a public interest law firm in San Jose, the Asian Law Alliance. The Student Immigration Relief Clinic provides vital legal support for immigration cases focusing on naturalization and DACA. This project serves three purposes: (1) this clinic project addresses the shortage of trained staff for immigration needs, (2) the student volunteers for this clinic are able to help change the lives of low-income undocumented youth, refugees, and green card holders seeking citizenship within the United States, and (3) this is an opportunity for students to gain exposure and hands-on experience... Read More

Isaac Miller (2010)

Youth Poetry and City Creation in Detroit

Detroit has become the poster child for the impact of both deindustrialization and economic collapse on America's inner cities. However, in the face of overwhelming problems, there is a growing movement to rebuild and re-imagine Detroit. Increasingly, Detroit is being seen not just as a place of despair, but as a source of inspiration in imagining new possibilities for cities in the twenty first century. Isaac's project will use workshops on poetry, community organizing, and participatory urban planning to empower Detroit youth as leaders in confronting the city's crisis and opportunity for change. "Youth Poetry and City Creation" will center around workshops for youth between the ages of 13-21. These workshops will create a space to build critical literacy, empowerment, and creativity, and will teach the fundamental skills of urban planning, community organizing, and writing and performing poetry. This novel combination will allow young people to participate in an educational... Read More

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