Displaying 36 - 55 of 55

Christopher Ategeka (2011)

Pedal or Power

"Obwomezi bwensi enu buli nka kagaali; tikasobora kugwa kasita kaba nikagenda" (translated from Rutooro as "Life is like a bicycle; in order to stay balanced you have to keep moving.") Those were the words of a stranger who gave Chris a ride on the back of his bicycle about a decade ago when he saw him on the side of the road catching his breath, blisters and cuts covering his bare feet after many miles of walking.

Motivated by his own experience growing up in rural Uganda and enduring first hand many of the difficulties posed by lack of adequate transportation, Chris will use his Stronach Baccalaureate Prize to launch "Pedal or Power," a project to help people in rural Uganda learn how to build and maintain their own bicycles using locally available resources. An additional aspect of the project is to refurbish used bicycles, motorizing them with small engines for flexible use. Bicycles will be distributed at no cost to school children, farmers, health care workers or local... Read More

Iman Abdella (2017)

Yemeni Youth Project (YYP)

Early in her academic career, Iman began to seek mentors who looked like her who could guide her growing intellectual curiosity. She soon noticed the lack of a bridge between her community and higher education. As a Yemeni woman, she experienced the difficulty in attaining proper representation in the academic world and fulfilling her need for mentorship and guidance. Iman’s project is an extension of the afterschool mentorship program for Yemeni students at Oakland International High School (OIHS) that she co-founded during her time at UC Berkeley. The Yemeni Youth Program (YYP) serves recent Yemeni immigrants and refugees at OIHS through personal and academic support. The Bay Area is home to the third largest Yemeni population in the United States. Mentors from UC Berkeley will connect with Yemeni students on a weekly basis. Lesson plans will be geared towards the needs of the students in all aspects of life. Through YYP, students will have the opportunity to visit college... Read More

William Ching (2009)

HIV Youth Project

In spite of recent anti-HIV/AIDS awareness and sexual health campaigns, youth continue to contract HIV at disproportionately higher rates than the general population. Stigma and fear of discrimination further discourage at-risk youth from getting tested. This creates additional barriers to treatment and negatively impacts the quality of life of youth who are already living with the disease. William Ching intends to illuminate the social and human costs of living with HIV/AIDS by collecting the oral histories of historically marginalized youth whose lives have been impacted by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. He plans to travel to major metropolitan areas around the country and work with both youth and community-based organizations to create a new HIV/AIDS education and prevention guide tailored to youth and young adults based on the lived experiences of HIV+ youth, women and communities of color. Underscoring education, prevention and destigmatization, William hopes to capitalize on... Read More

Jacob Seigel-Boettner (2010)

With My Own Two Wheels

For many in America, the bicycle commute is a lifestyle choice. For the other 99% of the world, each pedal stroke is progress out of poverty, toward an education, and over the mountains of social and cultural discrimination. With My Own Two Wheels, a feature- length documentary, will link together the stories of individuals who have been empowered by the bicycle. With the help of six bicycle development projects, With My Own Two Wheels will tell the stories of individuals from Belgium, Rwanda, Zambia, Ghana, India, Guatemala, and the United States. Despite the geographical distance between them, and the differing challenges that they face, all seven people profiled in the film have overcome hardship with the help of their bicycles. The film will launch a global fundraising campaign to get bicycles to health workers, farmers, and students around the globe so that they can change their worlds ... with their own two wheels.

To view the documentary, see ... Read More

Ryan Bosworth (2010)

Map Delft: A Community-Based Approach to the Provision of Informal Settlement Maps

Ryan's project is a community-building program designed to produce detailed, open-source street-level maps of three unmapped temporary relocation areas (TRAs) in Delft, Cape Town, South Africa; home to an estimated one hundred thousand displaced residents.

Ryan's work in Cape Town involves local community-based organizations, township residents, IkamvaYouth students (www.ikamvayouth.org), OpenStreetMap (OSM) volunteers, and students and faculty from the University of Cape Town in a participatory mapping project. The three main objectives of project are to (1) develop community support networks for recently displaced residents, (2) to strengthen the capacity of non-governmental and community-based organizations to provide relief to Delft residents, and (3) to teach computer literacy, basic web programming, and mapping workshops to a sample of the more than 600 economically disadvantaged youth currently enrolled in IkamvaYouth's after... Read More

Luis Flores (2013)

Discovering the IRCA Generation: Building Communal Migrant History and Credit Protection

By constructing a history and political economy of the "IRCA generation" of migrants*, this project will present a counterpoint to the burgeoning public migration debate and eminent legislation. Three million undocumented workers obtained legal status under Immigration Reform and Control Act’s (IRCA) 1986 amnesty provision. Yet remarkably, no significant attempt to recount the lessons and histories of this legislation has been made, even as a new amnesty law may be imminent. This time around, the resurgence of the migration debate has brought impassionate arguments for the provision of amnesty to millions of undocumented migrants living in the U.S. as a form of economic stimulus.

Migrant cultural assimilation is being articulated as their participation in home mortgage markets and in stressing that granting legal amnesty to undocumented migrants would generate an estimated input of $500 billion into the economy, immigration reform is also being promoted as a path to recovery... Read More

Adriana SanchezPillot (2015)

Indigenous Communities Building Historical Memory to Create Alternative Justice

Justice is composed of four elements: truth, reparations, sanctions, and non-repetition. This project aims to strengthen the efforts of the Chol organized communities in Northern Chiapas to create alternative forms of justice via a process of documenting historical memory and lived experiences. The purpose is to address the continuing violation of indigenous peoples’ right to justice, and the impunity of the crimes against humanity condoned by the Mexican State in the Northern and Forest regions of Chiapas between 1996 and 2006. These crimes happened in the context of the counterinsurgency war against the Zapatistas led by the Mexican government, as well as decades of unresolved land claims, displacement, and neoliberal reforms. In collaboration with the Fray Bartolomé de Las Casas Human Rights Center, the project will reinforce the Center’s legal, logistical, and media support of these cases. The process of constructing historical memory will involve documentation through... Read More

Maya Weir (2013)

Community Yoga Project

Maya's project, Community Yoga Project, seeks to increase access to the practice of yoga by holding classes at various social justice organizations in the East Bay Area. Unfortunately, through the process of appropriation in the West, yoga has become a commercial industry that is marketed predominantly to a privileged demographic. Maya brings this awareness into her teaching as she strives to create classes that take into account the impact of historical structures of oppression. Providing access to the transformative and powerful practice of yoga aims to improve the emotional and physical health and wellness of marginalized communities in the East Bay. She will partner with the following organizations: Phat Beets Produce, North County Women's Center, Causa Justa: Just Cause, Energy Solidarity Cooperative, Planting Justice, Multicultural Community Center, Oakland Rising, Communities for a Better Environment at Tassafaronga Recreation Center and The Living Room Project.... Read More

Nathan Bickart (2013)

Planting in Cal's Backyard: Raised-Bed Gardens for Creeks, Kids, and Communities

Nathan's project will focus on improving ecosystem and community health through the construction of raised-bed community gardens near Wildcat Creek, which runs through Richmond and San Pablo, CA. Riparian habitats in these communities, particularly when they occur at the end of a dead-end street, are frequently used as trash dumps by less-than-certified trash haulers, creating a hazard for the local community and driving citizens away from these natural spaces. Nathan will work with a variety of community partners, including Urban Creeks Council and the cities of Richmond and San Pablo, to build strategically placed raised-bed gardens that will prevent pick-up trucks from backing up to and polluting these neglected habitats. Furthermore, the project aims to improve the health of these challenged communities by increasing access to healthy foods (grown in the garden) and open spaces. Creek restoration will be pursued in concert with garden construction, such that the creek... Read More

Muska Fazilat (2015)

Safe Motherhood

Afghanistan has some of the highest maternal mortality and infant morbidity rates in the world. Most Afghan women do not have access to basic maternal health care, especially in rural areas. Skilled providers attend only 36% of births in Afghanistan with improvements in health care since US intervention, and every thirty minutes an Afghan woman dies due to birth complications. Over 80% of births take place at home in Afghanistan. Ms. Fazilat’s project, “Safe Motherhood,” aims to reduce maternal mortality rates in the poorest and most remote villages in Kunduz--a province located in Northeastern region of Afghanistan--by training and educating traditional midwives who currently lack formal training and essential medical knowledge about safe birthing practices.

Yoram Savion-Royant (2008)

Youth Multimedia Literacy & Production (Y Media-LP)

Yoram Savion-Royant will work to create a new narrative of crime and punishment that promotes restorative justice. Tapping into the creative and healing power of youth, he will develop and lead a sustainable employment program in media literacy at the Youth UpRising community center in East Oakland. His young trainees will produce professional multimedia articles for the Oakland Tribune, the Alameda County Behavioral Health Services, and other public interest websites. Focused on increased policing, widespread institutional failures, and mass incarceration, their stories will document the lived experience of urban youth, highlighting not only the problems they encounter but also their solutions, thus imagining possibilities for social change. The Oakland Tribune has been publishing stories by Savion-Royant's team as part of its 2007 Homicide Report and 2008 Pieces of the Puzzle project.

Julissa Muniz (2014)

Deconstructing the Juvenile Delinquent & Re-Creating the College Path

Julissa's project, "Deconstructing the Juvenile Delinquent & Re-Creating the College Path", seeks to curtail high recidivism rates by following a threefold model comprised of personal mentoring, sustained academic counseling, and the creation of a safe space to deconstruct the socially constructed labels imposed on youth by state institutions and society. This project will include monthly workshops at partner high schools with "high-risk populations" and monthly college preparatory workshops at San Francisco's Youth Guidance Center (Juvenile Hall). The second component will include the recruitment of 6-10 young women who will be released from YGC within four months of first contact. The cohort of young women will receive individualized college coaching, one-on-one mentorship and will participate in monthly workshops centered around issues of social justice and self-love, as well as monthly college campus tours geared towards post-secondary education and attainment.... Read More

Isaac Miller (2010)

Youth Poetry and City Creation in Detroit

Detroit has become the poster child for the impact of both deindustrialization and economic collapse on America's inner cities. However, in the face of overwhelming problems, there is a growing movement to rebuild and re-imagine Detroit. Increasingly, Detroit is being seen not just as a place of despair, but as a source of inspiration in imagining new possibilities for cities in the twenty first century. Isaac's project will use workshops on poetry, community organizing, and participatory urban planning to empower Detroit youth as leaders in confronting the city's crisis and opportunity for change. "Youth Poetry and City Creation" will center around workshops for youth between the ages of 13-21. These workshops will create a space to build critical literacy, empowerment, and creativity, and will teach the fundamental skills of urban planning, community organizing, and writing and performing poetry. This novel combination will allow young people to participate in an educational... Read More

Petro Kostiv (2006)

Land Reform in Post-Apartheid South Africa

Petro Kostiv is working with three indigenous Zulu communities in South Africa who were forcibly displaced from their land by the racist policies of past governments. Due to historical, socio-economic, and political marginalization, many dispossessed South Africans are still unable to have their grievances recognized today. Such communities were identified merely as a landless people following the end of apartheid while the harsh reality of their daily lives remained ignored. Petro's chief objective will be to study and give voice to their struggle in the new political context of democracy. His project will build on South African field work concerning apartheid that he completed in spring 2006 for his senior thesis in the History Department.

Darya Chernova (2017)

"Telaboratoria" - Body Laboratory

Telaboratoria, which means Body Laboratory in Russian, is a nine-month therapeutic and empowering dance and theater program for the LGBTQ community of St. Petersburg, Russia. The vision of Telaboratoria is based on the success of a four-hour pilot dance workshop that Dasha facilitated for the St. Petersburg transgender community in the spring of 2016 while doing Independent Study Abroad as a UC Berkeley student.

When marginalized groups participate in a practice of dance and theater, it has a tremendous effect on multiple aspects of their lives, such as getting health benefits from a physical activity, accessing one’s creativity and developing a sense of a collective identity. The Russian LGBTQ community is in dire need of such a creative movement program to survive in the hostile environment of institutionalized homophobia and transphobia. Having worked with LGBTQ individuals in the hostile Russian environment before, Dasha is partnering up with Coming Out... Read More

Katya Moiseeva (2011)

The Dark Side of Russian "High End" Prostitution

Ekaterina's goal is to raise awareness about the negative effects of social acceptance and non-stigmatization of Russian 'high end' prostitution. Although Russian high end prostitutes face as much dehumanization and abuse as trafficked women/children from other parts of the world, notably South-East Asia, India, and Eastern Europe, they do not garner the same degree of global awareness. One reason for this lack of awareness is that the profile of a high end prostitute–educated, upper/middle class, Prada-dressed, beautiful–does not easily conform to feminist theories portraying prostitution as a male coerced, desperate way for disadvantaged women to earn subsistence money. High end prostitution among Russians is socially accepted and often encouraged by women's parents and spouses; the money earned through prostitution allows for upward social mobility and increased social status. Ekaterina will travel to Russia, China and Turkey to conduct interviews with Russian women who... Read More

Camilo Salazar Prince (2006)

"Esta Noche" film

The film "Esta Noche" seeks to question labor practices and immigration policies in the United States and aims to portray the illegal immigrant as the new "invisible man" of our times. This fictional presentation will be based on a series of true stories of illegal Mexican/Latino immigrants, as recollected in interviews and documented by research. Produced by Divino Niño Filmes, "Esta Noche" will be Camilo Salazar Prince’s first feature-length film.

Senay Yitbarek (2007)

Preserving Biological Diversity in Shaded Coffee Plantations

For his Stronach project, Senay worked with small farmers in the Pontal do Paranapanemea region of Brazil, west of Sao Paulo, helping them to benefit from environmentally sound practices, thus strengthening efforts to preserve biologically diverse Brazilian forest fragments. Using his Portuguese language skills and cultural knowledge, Senay enhanced joint Movimento dos Tabalhadores Sem Terra (MST) and Institute for Ecological Research (IPE) efforts to preserve biologically diverse forest fragments. by creating an environmental education center and an environmental education curriculum that provided information about the benefits of ecological practices. In addition, Senay hosted exchanges about forestry practices between small farmers and state and interstate groups and organized seed collection workshops. Senay’s project helped to increase the number of farmers who dedicate land to agro-forestry buffer zones

Jonathan Lee (2009)

Community Health in Rural Honduras: Preventing Disease, Guarding Your Health

Jonathan Lee will be developing primary healthcare infrastructure in rural communities of the central, mountainous region of Honduras. Geographic, political, and economic distance from basic healthcare provoke what should be mild conditions into life threatening emergencies for the poor in this region. The centerpiece of his project is the training of community health workers (CHWs) to deliver efficient, home-based healthcare to families as well as to refer patients to La Clinica Santa Rosa de Lima, one of the only clinics for a widespread population of over 60,000. The CHWs, called Guardianes de Salud or "Health Guardians," will be empowered with a text messaging-based communication infrastructure that will provide two-way communication between nurses and physicians at La Clinica and the CHWs. This system, powered by FrontlineSMS:Medic, is a free, open-source software program that enables large-scale, two-way text messaging using only a laptop, a GSM modem, and cell phones.... Read More

Jeffrey Martin (2008)

The Gila River Indian Community Water Settlement Act: Understanding a Historical Milestone

Jeffrey Martin will conduct a detailed study of the Gila River Indian Community Water Settlement Act of 2004, one of the largest and longest-coming Indian water rights settlements in the history of the United States. Representing deeply entrenched battles over water rights and Indian sovereignty in the West, the Act settled nearly 30 years of litigation involving thousands of actors who fought to quantify and define rights on the Gila River. Jeff will examine the origin, voices, and impact of this historic legislation and its implications for future water disputes. The settlement brought water to the Pima and Maricopa peoples of southern Arizona following more than a century of struggle since the river was diverted from their lands in 1866, thus destroying their agricultural practices. Martin plans to interview tribal leaders and members, members of non-Indian business and agricultural interests, and government entities.

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