Displaying 36 - 55 of 55

Adrián Rodriguez Ríos

Two-sided Frontier: Untold Stories of the San Diego-Tijuana Border

Adrián’s project is concerned with the Tijuana-San Diego border and a lack of social consciousness for the deportee community. Through a series of interactive Art installations at the US-Mexican border,  Adrián will present the social conditions that the deportees endure in the city of Tijuana. It is his intention to bring to the fore the stories of migrants that have not had the opportunity to be heard. Supported by local organizations and artists, such as TJTQ and Fungi Express, the Art installations will target the binational population on the Mexican side of the San Ysidro-Tijuana pedestrian border. In the medium of chalkboard, photographs, coloring books, scale-models, and more, the project will engage with the transborder community seeking to form a sense of belonging and unity. The stories shared by the deportee community will inspire and be the base of the Art installations presented at the border for future diffusion. The project will enhance the... Read More

Julissa Muniz (2014)

Deconstructing the Juvenile Delinquent & Re-Creating the College Path

Julissa's project, "Deconstructing the Juvenile Delinquent & Re-Creating the College Path", seeks to curtail high recidivism rates by following a threefold model comprised of personal mentoring, sustained academic counseling, and the creation of a safe space to deconstruct the socially constructed labels imposed on youth by state institutions and society. This project will include monthly workshops at partner high schools with "high-risk populations" and monthly college preparatory workshops at San Francisco's Youth Guidance Center (Juvenile Hall). The second component will include the recruitment of 6-10 young women who will be released from YGC within four months of first contact. The cohort of young women will receive individualized college coaching, one-on-one mentorship and will participate in monthly workshops centered around issues of social justice and self-love, as well as monthly college campus tours geared towards post-secondary education and attainment.... Read More

Samma Ishaq (2008)

Documenting the Effects of the Shahtoosh Ban in Jammu and Kashmir: A Proposal to Find Alternative Sources of Income for Kashmiri Women

Samma Ishaq will evaluate the economic status of women living in Jammu and Kashmir (India-administered Kashmir). It is estimated that the livelihood of at least 50,000 workers, 74 percent of them women, was impacted when the local government banned the manufacture and sale of shahtoosh (a fine grade of shawl derived from the Tibetan antelope) in October 2000. Investigating this claim, Ishaq will assess the effect of the shahtoosh ban on the local economy, particularly on displaced female weavers. Her report will take into account the painful consequences of militarization over the past two decades since the region came under dispute by India, Pakistan and Kashmiri resistance fighters in 1989. Ultimately, she seeks to create a new program together with local NGOs that will empower and offer a source of revenue for the weavers, while addressing poverty issues that affect women.

Rajan Hoyle (2015)

Project Arihini

The Garifuna descend from West African, Carib and Arawak peoples and are considered indigenous to Honduras. These three groups were brought together when a slave ship traveling from West Africa to the Americas crashed on the island of San Vicente, ensuring the freedom of the captive men. Over two hundred years later, the Garifuna account for less than two percent of Honduras’s population and continue to experience acute marginalization in social, political and economic spheres of life.

Project Arihini is a community-based platform that will apply methods from the disciplines of planning and journalism to build a geographic information system (GIS) of and for eleven Garifuna villages that dot a twenty-mile span of the northern coast of Honduras. In addition, a series of short-form multimedia interviews will be recorded of Garifuna youth giving voice to their lived experiences and shedding light on contemporary opportunities and constraints of village life. The regional GIS... Read More

Katya Moiseeva (2011)

The Dark Side of Russian "High End" Prostitution

Ekaterina's goal is to raise awareness about the negative effects of social acceptance and non-stigmatization of Russian 'high end' prostitution. Although Russian high end prostitutes face as much dehumanization and abuse as trafficked women/children from other parts of the world, notably South-East Asia, India, and Eastern Europe, they do not garner the same degree of global awareness. One reason for this lack of awareness is that the profile of a high end prostitute–educated, upper/middle class, Prada-dressed, beautiful–does not easily conform to feminist theories portraying prostitution as a male coerced, desperate way for disadvantaged women to earn subsistence money. High end prostitution among Russians is socially accepted and often encouraged by women's parents and spouses; the money earned through prostitution allows for upward social mobility and increased social status. Ekaterina will travel to Russia, China and Turkey to conduct interviews with Russian women who... Read More

Nathan Bickart (2013)

Planting in Cal's Backyard: Raised-Bed Gardens for Creeks, Kids, and Communities

Nathan's project will focus on improving ecosystem and community health through the construction of raised-bed community gardens near Wildcat Creek, which runs through Richmond and San Pablo, CA. Riparian habitats in these communities, particularly when they occur at the end of a dead-end street, are frequently used as trash dumps by less-than-certified trash haulers, creating a hazard for the local community and driving citizens away from these natural spaces. Nathan will work with a variety of community partners, including Urban Creeks Council and the cities of Richmond and San Pablo, to build strategically placed raised-bed gardens that will prevent pick-up trucks from backing up to and polluting these neglected habitats. Furthermore, the project aims to improve the health of these challenged communities by increasing access to healthy foods (grown in the garden) and open spaces. Creek restoration will be pursued in concert with garden construction, such that the creek... Read More

Pablo Seward (2014)

"Umanga Tupuna": A Communal Intervention in Contemporary Rapanui History

"Umanga Tupuna" ("Food-Work With Ancestors") consists of the re-conceptualization of Easter Island (Chile), a Polynesian island in the South Pacific Ocean, as the complex performance space it used to be prior to colonial dispossession in the 19th century. The first stage of the project will be to gather oral historians, and to enlist and re-inhabit key places on the island with unresolved histories. Inhabitation for Rapanui people consists of making offerings to emplaced ancestors, who then reciprocally share thoughts, dreams, and stories of the place. The second stage of the project will be to collaboratively make illustrated fictionalized accounts of these experiences. The third stage will be to organize free trips around the island for Rapanui children, as well as workshops with the general population, such that the place-histories in question may be put in conversation with one another. The fourth and final stage will be to compile, publish, and divulge the illustrated... Read More

Irene Chemtai Mungo (2007)

Community Health Education and Training Project: Mombasa, Kenya

Like most of Sub-Saharan Africa, Kenya is adversely affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic, with over 1.3 million people living with the virus. For her Stronach project, Irene endeavored to provide critical health education at the AIDS Research and Family Care Clinic in the Kenyan city of Mombasa, where poverty, joblessness, limited education, and cultural stigma are all obstacles to treating and caring for children with HIV/AIDS. She developed a health resource guidebook in both English and Swahili to help families better understand HIV/AIDS and provide proper care for children with the disease. She wanted her guidebook to communicate health lessons through simple language and the drawings of local children. Irene also planned to organize educational workshops for caregivers and adolescent patients, bring presentations on HIV/AIDS and other health topics to area schools, and sponsor an essay contest in which students could propose ways to address health issues in their lives and... Read More

Lauren Herman (2011)

Expanding the Realm of Consumer Protection: The Case of Microcredit

While working and conducting research within a microcredit program in Kenya during the summer of 2010 and in January 2011, Lauren became aware of the lack of consumer protection measures to prevent predatory lending within microfinance institutions (MFIs). To bring awareness to this issue, Lauren's project will contribute to the legal education initiatives and resources for Kenyan microcredit borrowers through the creation of a consumer and legal education manual. She will collaborate with consumer advocacy groups and microcredit borrowers in Nairobi, Kenya to research and document the operational and loan requirements of the five largest Kenyan MFIs. This educational resource will assist clients in making informed and educated decisions about their participation in these financial institutions. Most importantly, the experiences of microcredit borrowers will be included in the manual to provide potential borrowers the opportunity to learn about the microcredit programs... Read More

Margaux Fitoussi (2011)

Transforming Radio Operators into Human Rights Reporters

Working with Invisible Children, a non-profit based in San Diego, Margaux will develop and facilitate a series of Human Rights reporting workshops in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in order to improve the quality of information broadcast from high frequency radio towers in the region. Invisible Children has been working to increase the number of radio towers in this area in order to improve the long-distance communication between remote locations. Based in local parishes, these towers act as an early warning mechanism to warn villages of the movements of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), a rebel group originating in northern Uganda. Margaux will work closely with Congolese radio tower operators to improve their reporting techniques and the documentation of the LRA's human rights abuses. The early warning system aims to improve tracking of the LRA's movements and the effectiveness of humanitarian groups to respond to LRA attacks. This project could... Read More

Brett Buckingham and Ailén Vega (2016)

Participatory Mapping in Brazil's Tapajós River Basin

Brett and Ailén’s project engages the Munduruku indigenous communities of the northern Brazilian Amazon in a participatory, counter-hegemonic mapping project.  The Munduruku people are currently fighting against the Brazilian government’s plans to construct what would become one of the world’s largest hydroelectric dams, the São Luiz do Tapajós, and lead to the decimation of the Munduruku’s means of survival and of a sacred place central to their identity as a people. With the support of partner organizations Amazon Watch and Digital Democracy, Brett and Ailén will work alongside communities to produce maps that depict the land practices, cultural spaces, and histories of the Munduruku through community workshops and open-source mapping technologies. In positioning the Munduruku as the leaders of the mapping process, this project creates alternative cartographic representations to support these communities’ lobbying efforts on the national and international level.

Cherie Hill (2006)

Remembering the Ancestors

Directed and choreographed by Cherie Hill, the work blends modern and Afro-Caribbean dance featuring live percussion by New York artist Taji Maalik. The dance premied in December of 2006 at the Live Oak Theatre in Berkeley.

Remembering the Ancestors expands on Cherie's senior honors research, which explored how dance could be used to subvert stereotypes associated with black women. Cherie traveled to Jamaica to study ancient Caribbean and Diaspora dances that early European explorers considered overtly sexual. She made these dances the basis for her modern piece, choreographed using postmodern techniques. Cherie also plans to host two creative dance workshops for at-risk children. Her work raises awareness about issues of race and gender and depictions of black women in popular culture.

Video of Remembering the Ancestors

Rachel Gottfried-Clancy And Gabriel Schwartzman (2014)

Mapping Environmental Justice: Citizen Science, Community Stories, and Public Data for Community Organizing

Rachel and Gabe will be launching a web platform and community organizing effort to serve communities in the midst of water crises, focusing on Southern West Virginia's coalfields and the Sacramento River Delta. The project will create a participatory web platform that involves all aspects of the water-quality monitoring process: from context and data collection, to visualization and organization. The web platform will incorporate government and community-collected data to bridge the gap between the "authoritative" and the "subjective". We hope to integrate data production and analysis with community participation and improve access to water-quality information, which communities can then use for political projects. The project will require a collaborative process amongst grassroots organizations, water experts, technical specialists and community members to implement participatory water monitoring efforts. To generate the necessary data to launch the online organizational... Read More

Jeffrey Martin (2008)

The Gila River Indian Community Water Settlement Act: Understanding a Historical Milestone

Jeffrey Martin will conduct a detailed study of the Gila River Indian Community Water Settlement Act of 2004, one of the largest and longest-coming Indian water rights settlements in the history of the United States. Representing deeply entrenched battles over water rights and Indian sovereignty in the West, the Act settled nearly 30 years of litigation involving thousands of actors who fought to quantify and define rights on the Gila River. Jeff will examine the origin, voices, and impact of this historic legislation and its implications for future water disputes. The settlement brought water to the Pima and Maricopa peoples of southern Arizona following more than a century of struggle since the river was diverted from their lands in 1866, thus destroying their agricultural practices. Martin plans to interview tribal leaders and members, members of non-Indian business and agricultural interests, and government entities.

Isaac Miller (2010)

Youth Poetry and City Creation in Detroit

Detroit has become the poster child for the impact of both deindustrialization and economic collapse on America's inner cities. However, in the face of overwhelming problems, there is a growing movement to rebuild and re-imagine Detroit. Increasingly, Detroit is being seen not just as a place of despair, but as a source of inspiration in imagining new possibilities for cities in the twenty first century. Isaac's project will use workshops on poetry, community organizing, and participatory urban planning to empower Detroit youth as leaders in confronting the city's crisis and opportunity for change. "Youth Poetry and City Creation" will center around workshops for youth between the ages of 13-21. These workshops will create a space to build critical literacy, empowerment, and creativity, and will teach the fundamental skills of urban planning, community organizing, and writing and performing poetry. This novel combination will allow young people to participate in an educational... Read More

Muska Fazilat (2015)

Safe Motherhood

Afghanistan has some of the highest maternal mortality and infant morbidity rates in the world. Most Afghan women do not have access to basic maternal health care, especially in rural areas. Skilled providers attend only 36% of births in Afghanistan with improvements in health care since US intervention, and every thirty minutes an Afghan woman dies due to birth complications. Over 80% of births take place at home in Afghanistan. Ms. Fazilat’s project, “Safe Motherhood,” aims to reduce maternal mortality rates in the poorest and most remote villages in Kunduz--a province located in Northeastern region of Afghanistan--by training and educating traditional midwives who currently lack formal training and essential medical knowledge about safe birthing practices.

Senay Yitbarek (2007)

Preserving Biological Diversity in Shaded Coffee Plantations

For his Stronach project, Senay worked with small farmers in the Pontal do Paranapanemea region of Brazil, west of Sao Paulo, helping them to benefit from environmentally sound practices, thus strengthening efforts to preserve biologically diverse Brazilian forest fragments. Using his Portuguese language skills and cultural knowledge, Senay enhanced joint Movimento dos Tabalhadores Sem Terra (MST) and Institute for Ecological Research (IPE) efforts to preserve biologically diverse forest fragments. by creating an environmental education center and an environmental education curriculum that provided information about the benefits of ecological practices. In addition, Senay hosted exchanges about forestry practices between small farmers and state and interstate groups and organized seed collection workshops. Senay’s project helped to increase the number of farmers who dedicate land to agro-forestry buffer zones

Jenna Cavelle (2012)

Recovering Cultural Memory: Irrigation Systems of the Owens Valley Paiute Indians

Jenna will travel to the Owens Valley to conduct a 9-month community service project which combines education, outreach, and technology to engage the Paiute Indian community in restoring cultural memory associated with their ancient irrigation systems. These waterworks are currently in danger of being lost in the Owens Valley landscape through weathering and human neglect, and in American memory through the loss of culturally transmitted traditional knowledge. Through community education and engagement, Jenna will work with tribal members to explore archival materials and document Paiute irrigation systems and their role in shaping Paiute culture through narrative, photography, and GIS/GPS mapping. As these remnant waterworks have not been properly mapped or maintained it is vitally important to resurrect Paiute understanding of the cultural significance of these irrigation systems and their place in Paiute traditional cultural landscapes. The results of Jenna's project will... Read More

Emma Shaw Crane (2009)

Indigenous Women's Media and Poetry Project

Working with COMPPA, a collective based in Chiapas, Mexico, Emma will develop and facilitate the Indigenous and Garífuna Women's Media and Poetry Project, a series of workshops offered at peoples' community organizations in Chiapas and Oaxaca (Mexico), Petén, Alta Verapaz, and Quiché, (Guatemala), and Intibucá, Antlántida & Tegucigalpa (Honduras). The project proposes to address underdevelopment, low literacy rates, and lack of political representation for indigenous and Garífuna communities, particularly women, through community radio and poetry. The central premise of the project is that access to media and literacy among young women is integral to economic, cultural, political self-determination. The project emphasizes the community radio and poetry as necessary tools of resistance and as ways of building autonomy.

In the process of completing this project, Emma will strengthen her facilitation skills and develop a variety of Spanish-language poetry and media arts... Read More

Matthew Chang (2017)

The Student Immigration Relief Clinic

Matthew’s project, the Student Immigration Relief Clinic, addresses the need for pro-bono legal immigration documentation assistance as well as the shortage of volunteers to provide this service. The Student Immigration Relief Clinic is a student run, free legal clinic to be held regularly throughout the academic year. This clinic is supported by various UC Berkeley student organizations along with a public interest law firm in San Jose, the Asian Law Alliance. The Student Immigration Relief Clinic provides vital legal support for immigration cases focusing on naturalization and DACA. This project serves three purposes: (1) this clinic project addresses the shortage of trained staff for immigration needs, (2) the student volunteers for this clinic are able to help change the lives of low-income undocumented youth, refugees, and green card holders seeking citizenship within the United States, and (3) this is an opportunity for students to gain exposure and hands-on experience... Read More

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